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important medical and health sciences institutions remain world class. by merging rutgers and umdnj in the north and rowan and umdnj's stratford campus in the south, we will enhance three established hubs of educational excellence in north, south, and central new jersey. and we will bring rutgers, and new jersey medical education, into the 21st century. i thank you for passing this plan, and i was proud to sign it into law this summer. in k-12 education, we have made great strides, but there is much more to be done. who would have thought, just three years ago, in the face of entrenched resistance, that i could stand here and congratulate us today for the following -- ensuring accountability by passing the first major reform of tenure in 100 years, establishing performance-based pay in newark through hard-nosed collective bargaining so that we can reward and retain the very best teachers where we need them most, implementing inter-district school choice, which has tripled its enrollment in the last 3 years and will grow to 6,000 students next year, growing the number of charter scho
sandy, t the disappearing ice slights at the north pole becoming ever harder to ignore but science and facts continue to demonstrate that yes climate change is real. so no one should really be surprised the last year was the hottest on record for north america, shattering the old record by one entire degree. that may not sound like a lot but keep in mind, if the world's average temperature increases by 5 degrees scientists think sea levels could climb as much as 20 feet causing cities like miami new orleans, to go the route of atlantis. skeptics keep on being skeptics. you are right. climate change science is a sinister conspiracy by the entire world scientific community to slightly reduce corporate profit by convincing people that air pollution is bad. that makes a lot more sense. joining us now via skype is heroic environmentalist and founder of 350.org the man who's become the leading face in the movement to raise awareness about climate change, bill mckickin'. it is an honor to have you here on the program. >> very good to be with you. >> john: is it worst that we broke the rec
in answering it. >> what do you say to the secularist? >> i say let's engage on the science. let me hear what your arguments are and then let's respond to them. and i would ask in turn that you listen to what the scientific community has to say. it's perfectly fine to have a great conversation with many people about the science itself because the science is so robust at this point. i mean, we have basically known for over 20 years now that, and it actually boils down, for all the complexity of the science it's really quite simple. it's real, okay, climate change is real. it is mostly human caused this time. there have been climate changes over many millions of years in the past that had nothing to do with human beings. this time it's mostly being caused by our activities. third, it's going to be bad. in fact, it's bad now and it's going to get worse. fourth, there's hope, that there are lots of solutions already on the table that are in fact already being implemented in this country, communities all across this country as well as around the world. there's an enormous amount of work that we ca
christy is wrong, i do not have to tell him that, because the science tells him that. >> there was a poll, saying that parents think in video games contributes to a culture of violence. 89% of parents polled, point the finger of violence to tv and movies. what do you say to the parents every day, everything americans that are saying that as a parent, they look at it and feel that way that these violent video games add something to the culture of youth they are raising? >> well, first of all, i support the rights of any parent to not buy any product that they do not want to buy for their children. and that is why the video game industry has spent a long time cataloging and creating ratings systems and labeling descriptions on every game that is sold in the stores so they know what is it in so they do not have to buy it for their children. the science points to something different that the science shows that and this is confirmed by the surgeon general and by the supreme court that video games are not posing danger for adults or children. >> when we look at 2008, the stats, game makers have
medal of science. tim tooten is live in the newsroom with that story. big news for him, sam. >> he is a distinguished professor of physics, but his resume also includes a seat on the state board of education. the national medal of science from the white house is one of the highest honors given to scientists, engineers, and inventors. dr. gates is the author of more than 200 publications. he has been a member of the state school board since 2009. he says it is a nice surprise. >> the personal meaning i take from it is in order to get this sort of recognition, some of the world's best physicists had to support the research program i had been pursuing. that kind of affirmation -- you cannot put a price on a. >> he will be honored at the white house in a ceremony later this year. dr. gates received his degrees and ph.d. from mit. he has done postgraduate work at harvard and caltech. tim tooten, wbal tv-11 news. >> coming up, another staff choice on capitol hill. >> president obama's nomination for treasury secretary. >> different, emotional approaches to saturday's showdown. later in s
is the continued united states pre-eminence, not just in demand space programs but in terms of science and inventions and everything else that goes along with it, and it ended up being washed away in the flood of stimulus france. as this hearing has highlighted already, the president's approach to human spaceflight lacks a clear mission and he is relying on the success of commercial space, which i agreed is vital that has dragged its feet and pushed its flight at nasa. i strongly support a public-private partnership for the country's space policy. however, it is up to nasa to develop the heavy lift rocket because the private sector doesn't have enough funds to do it by itself, and that heavy lift rocket needs enough thrust to overcome the administration shortsightedness. now why cancel inhofe, the international partners who supported the mission, president obama has taken a been there and done that approach but we haven't been there for 40 years and the international partners who would have helped us have never been there. if we cannot lead the world with space, china and russia will i
of a classroom or a building? >> it was inside of the science building, but i don't know if it was in a classroom or a hall way. i don't have that information. >> was it mid-class? >> i don't know. it was sometime this morning. i'm not sure what time it was this morning or if they were in a classroom or a hall way between classes. i don't know. >> just to confirm, one victim, the one student injured, airlifted to a hospital. one single injury? >> that's the information that we have at this point, yes. >> i know this is very, very early, but any connection between the student who was shot and the student shooter? >> we don't have information on that at this point. >> final question of other schools in the area on lockdown? what's the status? >> that i don't know. i don't know if we lockdown the other schools in the taft area or not. >> ray pruitt from the kern county sheriff's department. we thank you so much for calling in. give us a call back if you hear anything else. that is new information we got from this school shooting. the fact that the shooter was a student and used a shotgun. this happe
questions. that's what we do. journalism isn't a perfect science. to suggest that the shootings didn't happen, that 20 children weren't killed and that they aren't suffering and still suffering, tracy is not the only one spinning conspiracy theories on youtube and online. this is from a website i don't want to use. some are claiming that 6-year-old emilie parker killed in sandy hook didn't actually die. now, as proof, they point to a dress she was wearing in a family photo before the shooting. it's the same dress that emily's little sister wore when president obama met with victim's families. so the people online, these conspiracy theorists are saying that is actually emily on president obama's lap. it is a sickening claim. there is no other word for it. there is another one on another website that they use an interview that noah posner's mother did on this program to make its point. here is some of the interview. watch the conversation i had with her first. >> how are you holding up? >> most of the time, i'm kind of numb. i think about -- i think every mama out there can relate to t
's what we do. journalism is not a perfect science, but to suggest it means that the shootings didn't happen and the children were not kill and the families didn't and are not still suffering is beyond comprehension and deeply offensive to many. as we said, tracy is not the only one spinning experience theories on you tube and online. i don't want to give them traffic so i won't use their names, but they claim emilie parker killed in sandy hook didn't actual lie die. they point to address the dress she was wearing before the shooting is the same dress that emily's sister wore when president obama met with victims's families. so the people online, these experience theorists are saying that's actually emilie on president obama's lap. it's a sickening claim. another on another website that i won't name either, they use an interview that noah posner's mother did to make its point. here's the interview before i tell you the theory, watch the conversation i had with her first. >> how are you holding up? >> most of the time i'm kind of numb. i think about -- i think every mom out there can
the political science community telling us if you look at where obama's approval ratings, these were not carter or bush sr. numbers, there was growth there. they were saying all year this guy should be a slight favorite to win reelection and low and behold after the drama he ends up winning by five million votes. do you think we appreciate it that obama was in pretty good shape? >> not great, but decent. >> it was like a chia pet election. you water it and it kept growing and growing. a lot of this has to do with the fact that the campaign knows how to do this campaign thing. they were able to expand and maximize what they had on the ground. you can't substitute. there is no substitute in this day and age for the target of the voters and reaches the audience and brings them out. nobody has done it better. not even in 2008. >> as we watch, thank you for joining us. president obama will take the oath of office in 12 days and preparations are under way in washington. the stage is being construct and we just learned that beyonce, kelly clark son and james taylor will perform. beyonce will belt out
colbert's mind last night. now neil, one of the most popular science writers of our time takes us for a wild ride through the universe here on "the cycle." >> you have said i'm related to a fish, right? >> oh, yeah. the challenge here is taking it to rocks and planets and stellar processes and the big bang. itsd the unity of all physical entities in the world. >> can you get me $5 worth of whatever it is? sometimes what we suffer from is bigger than we think ... like the flu. with aches, fever and chills- the flu's a really big deal. so why treat it like it's a little cold? there's something that works differently than over-the-counter remedies. prescription tamiflu attacks the flu virus at its source. so don't wait. call your doctor right away. tamiflu is prescription medicine for treating the flu in adults and children one year and older whose flu symptoms started within the last two days. before taking tamiflu tell your doctor if you're pregnant, nursing. have serious health conditions, or take other medicines. if you develop an allergic reaction, a severe rash, or signs of unu
think you have to ask those questions. those are simple questions. it is not rocket science. i used to teach in american university. used to teach courses to cops and prosecutors. this is not rocket science. i don't know if aid should be rocket science. i have been impressed that some people have said we really need a designed program knowing where we are working. if we know we're working in the most corrupt country and the world, we design a program that protects the funding. i was very impressed with that. i have not seen a program with that bill 10. people tell me they are thinking about it. some the -- someone told me the norwegians do that but i have not run into many norwegians. yes, sir? you are norwegian? >> no. one thing i came away with is that the afghans are very good at running their own businesses but what we do as we create an incentive or by running a business is about profits. i have partnered with an afghan and several afghans' over there and we are trying to build infrastructure where afghans have a stake in the infrastructure itself rather than just jobs today an
in science and technology. and we're investing much less than we used to in core areas of education. state universities for example are being decimated. so if you don't invest for the future, where are you going to get the growth in the future? >> but in 2008 and 2009, invest became a bad word, invest became government spending. when you're talking about investing, you're talking about it in a fairly sophisticated manner. some in the government. some the private sector, each on their own and some jointly. that kind of discussion feels dead on arrival in this political environment where we can't get something like a basic budget done. >> the problem is we're going to have to do some of this, anyway. anyone who owns a home knows this. if you defer maintenance, if you say to yourself, my boiler is leaking but i'm not going to fix it, that's actually a penny wise, pound-foolish decision. it will eventually break and cost you three times as much. that's what's happening with our roads, bridges and highways. if you look at air travel. we have one of the world's most antiquated travel systems, we
, celeste ward gventer, thank you. >> thank you so much, judy. >> thank you. >> brown: next, a science and medical story involving research from the frontiers of robotics. ray suarez looks at how doctors are using high tech toys to help people with special needs. >> what's your favorite game? >> "mario cart," the original. >> reporter: in a carefully monitored session that seems more like playtime than therapy, researchers at the university of notre dame have enlisted an unusual therapist to assist their studies of children with autism, a two foot robot named kelly. >> i got to skip school today, because of you guys. >> that is so cool. i am so glad. >> reporter: kelly is working with 11 year old liam mcguire and a co-therapist of the human kind, kristen wier. >> for liam, kelly has become a friend. i mean, he's very excited to see her. you can tell, he lights up when he sees kelly, he leans forward, his posture changes, his eye contact is much stronger. i think it's something he can relate to, and feel successful with. >> i like to play soccer. >> reporter: robots, like this one are b
in the real world but the science has been modeled and looks like it would actually work. the trick is getting the salt particles to the very particular size and very large quantity that would be necessary to do this on a scale that actually matters. >> so how close are we to that actually happening? i mean seems like it's out of a science fiction movie. >> it does and i should be very clear that the people that are working on in in silicon valley, they have no intention of actually taking these machines out to ocean beach and starting to test it on their own. they are just focused on working in the lab, developing the technology that they think will be capable of doing it and they think they are pretty close. they would then turn it over to academic or government researchers to decide what to do. >> and that brings us into the area where you have -- if you have this technology, if it goes to academic or federal researchers, you need federal or academic money to back this and that will bring a debate in, won't it? because there's some concern about should you be coming up with measures that de
, celeste ward gventer thank you. >> thank you so much, judy. >> thank you. >> brown: next, a science and medical story involving research from the frontiers of robotics. ray suarez looks at how doctors are using high tech toys to help people with special needs. >> what's your favorite game? >> "mario cart," the original. >> reporter: in a carefully monitored session that seems more like playtime than therapy, researchers at the university of notre dame have enlisted an unusual therapist to assist their studies of children with autism, a two foot robot named kelly. >> i got to skip school today, because of you guys. >> that is so cool. i am so glad. >> reporter: kelly is working with 11 year old liam mcguire and a co-therapist of the human kind, kristen wier. >> for liam, kelly has become a friend. i mean, he's very excited to see her. you can tell, he lights up when he sees kelly, he leans forward, his posture changes, his eye contact is much stronger. i think it's something he can relate to, and feel successful with. >> i like to play soccer. >> reporter: robots, like this one are b
to focus on other things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. so we created the extraordinarily comfortable sleep number experience. a collection of innovations designed around a bed with dualair technology that allows you to adjust to the support your body needs - each of your bodies. our sleep professionals will help you find your sleep number setting. exclusively at a sleep number store. sleep number. comfort individualized. queen mattresses start at just $699. and now save 50% on the closeout of our silver limited edition bed. ends sunday. >>> welcome back to the second half of "outfront." we start with stories we care about, where we focus on reporting from the front line, and we begin with an "outfront" update to a story we've been following. the army investigating another case of abuse at an army day care center in ft. meyer, virginia. the army, according to a spokesman, was notified yesterday that a child care worker allegedly slapped a child. the incident was reported by another caregiver in the room. the alleged perpetrator
to in infrastructure. we're investing half as much in science and technology. and we're investing much less than we used to in core areas of education -- state universities, for example, are being decima decimated. if you don't invest for the future, where are you going to get the growth? >> but in 2008 and 2009, invest became a bad word. it became government spending. when you're talking about investing, you're talking about a sophisticated manner. some government, some private sector, some on their own and some jointly. >> precisely. >> that kind of discussion feels dead on arrival in this political environment where we can't even get a budget done. >> and the problem is we're going to have to do some of this anyway. anyone who owns a home knows this. if you differ maintenance, my boiler is leaking but i'm not going to fix it, that's penny-wise but pound pool foolish. the whole thing will break and cost you three times the amount. air travel. we have one of the world's most antiquated air traffic systems. we need to update the computers. it's $25 billion. we're not spending that money because as
about this law, because critics say it damages our ability to truly know, using serious science, the impact that guns have on public health and public safety, impeding research on gun safety, and preventing doctors from talking to patients about the potential health risks that come with gun ownership. add advocates who support the law say it protects the rights of gun owners. the national rifle association somehow managed to put this stealth legislation into president obama's health care reform bill. the question is how and why. and why, whatever you think of a law, one of the president's top allies, that's right, the president's ally, helped the nra get it passed. no surprise that there's a big dose of politics involved here. jim acosta tonight is keeping 'em honest. >> when president obama signed national health care reform into law, few in washington knew that buried in the legislation's more than 900 pages was a gift to the nation's powerful gun lobby. but here it is. a provision entitled "protection of second amendment rights." it states the government and health insurers c
guidance and be able to focus on other things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. so mr. corrie inhold as you may know is shutting down some these pot clubs operating for years because of all the social problems. in portugal they have legalized drugs and had a lot of problems there in zurich they had to stop that. what do you think about that. >> this is america and a free country. the voters of colorado have spoken and we want to treat marijuana like alcohol that was what amendment 64 is all about. it is much safer to treat it that way in a regulated fashion and that's what we are doing. there are hundreds of thousands of alcohol clubs all over america. we are just like those except marijuana. >> bill: i'm wondering about the safer comment. i used to live in denver as you know. everybody has a car. mass transit very minor there in colorado. they go to your club 64. you don't sell marijuana there but you allow them to use. sit sit around and have little snacks i'm sure you sell. then they have to leave and go home and they are ston
? >> the science would say that alcohol is more detrimental. >> bill: one beer, one glass of wine because there are blood alcohol levels that you have to obey. one beer, one glass of wine as opposed to smoking a marijuana cigarette which they are going to do in your club. you don't see any difference? >> i would say it's about the same. >> bill: about the same. okay. >> it is. >> bill: i don't think you are going to get a lot of flack on that statement. in los angeles, medical marijuana clinics more than 200 of them have been closed down in the state of california i should say. a lot of them in l.a. the reason is that authorities said around these clinics with drug dealers. okay? because people who are in the drug culture, ie marijuana, then are a little bit -- have a little bit more tendency to use other drugs and that was attracting the dealers. also something that you don't have to worry about because you are not selling drugs at club 64. buying selling it to children. that was a big problem as well. but the culture that is being created by this intoxicant, marijuana does holland, port
'll set money aside from his first day of work to his last, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. spending the day with my niece. i don't use super poligrip for hold because my dentures fit well. before those little pieces would get in between my dentures and my gum and it was uncomfortable. even well-fitting dentures let in food particles. super poligrip is zinc free. with just a few dabs, it's clinically proven to seal out more food particles so you're more comfortable and confident while you eat. so it's not about keeping my dentures in, it's about keeping the food particles out. [ charlie ] try zinc free super poligrip. trying to find a better job can likbe frustrating.gs, so at university of phoenix we're workinwith a growing list of almost two thousand corporate partners - companies like microsoft, american red cross and adobe - to create options for you. not only that, we're using what we learn from these partners to shape our curriculum, so that when you find the job you want you'll be a perfect fit. let's get to work. >>> the u.s. military has a
each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. it's just common sense. [ female announcer ] some people like to pretend a flood could never happen to them. and that their homeowners insurance protects them. [ thunder crashes ] it doesn't. stop pretending. only flood insurance covers floods. ♪ visit floodsmart.gov/pretend to learn your risk. sven gets great rewards for his small business! how does this thing work? oh, i like it! [ garth ] sven's small business earns 2% cash back on every purchase, every day! woo-hoo!!! so that's ten security gators, right? put them on my spark card! why settle for less? testing hot tar... great businesses deserve great rewards! [ male announcer ] the spark business card from capital one. choose unlimited rewards with 2% cash back or double miles on every purchase, every day! what's in your wallet? here's your invoice. >>> our second story "outfront," football to blame. the national institutes of health says former nfl linebacker junior seau had a degenerative brain disease linked to multiple head traumas when he
. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: as unemployment, growth and budget concerns continue, the man who will lead president obama's new economic team was formally nominated today. the announcement came this afternoon, the latest in a series of major cabinet changes. >> one reason jack has been so effective in this town is because he is a low-key guy who prefers to surround himself with policy experts rather than t.v. cameras. >> brown: with that, the president introduced his nominee to be the next secretary of the treasury, jack lew, the man he made his chief of staff, a year ago yesterday. lew would succeed tim geithner, who drew fulsome praise from the president. >> when the history books are written tim geithner's going to go down as one o
with a shotgun in a science classroom, wounding one student and leaving three others with minor injuries. another school shooting doesn't change the difficult politics of this issue. though biden's meeting came with a photo op. >> as an owner of shotguns, as a guy, i'm no great hunter, mostly skeet shooting for me. >> both the nra meeting and an evening meeting with the entertainment representatives pictured here were closed. during his movie, "django unchained" quentin tarantino with movies like "pulp fiction" refused to answer the question about the possibility of violent images. >> the vice president is talking to the people in the movie industry today about violence. >> and you know where i stand on it. >> which is that there is no relationship. >> yes. >> but you haven't said why you think there is no relationship. >> it's none of your damn business what i think about that. >> there you go. an arraignment hearing for james holmes, the shooter who killed 12 people and injured dozens more at a movie theatre in aurora, collapsed summer and claimed to be inspired by "batman's" joker is scheduled
exploitation, spreading its roots in science and technology around the world. and he had enemies here. his enemies with the southern segregation. the anti-imperialists, and the conservatives who said american fascists are those people who think wall street -- so he had enemies and those enemies want to get rid of him on the ticket in 1944. the big problem was he was enormously popular. on july 20, 1944, the night the convention starts in chicago, potential voters who they want to run on vice president dick 65% said they wanted wallace on the ticket or 2% said they wanted harry truman. the question was how was the party bosses going to support. roosevelt was very feeble. when party bosses are to come to them and they want to get wallace off the ticket, roosevelt says to him, i support wallace but i can't fight this campaign myself. i'm not strong enough again. i am depending on you guys to do it. finally, caved in. his family was furious. eleanor roosevelt was furious with them. every one of the rows of kids was furious with them. they were huge wallace supporters. he had all the black dele
fill with mud and a very sophisticated science you can reconstruct environmental histories going back in time. this is the 1920s and 1800's and look at past pollution levels preserved in the archive like a history book in the bottom of a lake. >> say that pollution levels right now are low, but you think they're going to go up over time but it strikes me even in the example you were just talking about and in saying they're low you're comparing them to a pristine environment that was the wilderness but the level you're finding are lower than what we would find in most cities. >> right now, well these are wilderness lakes we should say. these lakes are anywhere from 30 kilometers or sorry, 60 miles to 60 miles away from the major source. you have to fly into the lakes typically with a helicopter or something. they're not right no the oil sand operation. what is i think important to say, if you look at our most polluted site, which is about 15 miles let's say approximately from the major operation, if you look at that, that current levels would find in a city. what is different in many c
. there was an outcry provoked by this horrific crime. in a new delhi suburb, science of how slow change may be. the authorities and their attitudes -- signs of how slow change may be. another woman was found dead after a suspected gang rape. she was going home from her job at a factory. when her father reported her missing, police did not listen. >> they were rude and said she had probably gone off with a man. do not worry, she will come back. >> another family grieving now. many ask if things will really change it when the ander dies down -- anger dies down. >> there is a heavy police presence in belfast after violent protests involving children as young as 10. the disturbance was sparked by the decision to limit the number of days the union flag flies over city hall. dozens of police officers have been injured. our correspondent has sent us the latest. >> the main route through east belfast looks like a battleground. pilots for the fifth consecutive night. -- riots for the fifth consecutive night. the protest target five weeks ago. there is no end in sight. political leaders are well aware o
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 303 (some duplicates have been removed)